Choral Evensong - 04 November 2016

Recorded on
Friday, 4 November 2016

Jonathan Harvey's Remember, O Lord features as the anthem of this week's Choral Evensong webcast.

Jonathan Harvey (1939 - 2012) was closely connected to St. John's College throughout his life; he was an undergraduate music scholar, eventually gaining a doctorate from the University of Cambridge, and was then made an Honorary Fellow of St. John's College in 2002. Remember, O Lord was written to honour the fiftieth anniversary of the coronation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. It stands as a contemporary equivalent to Herbert Howells' Behold, O God our defender, which had been written for the coronation fifty years earlier.

William Byrd (ca.1540 - 1623) composed around 470 works during his lifetime in the forms prevalent in England during that time, including sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard and viol consort music. After holding the post of organist at Lincoln Cathedral and consequently the role of Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, Byrd, along with Thomas Tallis, was granted a 21-year patent for the printing of music and ruled music paper. Byrd upheld a very favourable reputation from scholars, fellow composers, and students alike; one of Byrd's students, Thomas Morley, dedicated his treatise, A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke, to his teacher.

Photo: Maurice Foxall / Faber Music

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