The Gents lead a vocal workshop at Thorndown Primary School

Posted on: 30 July 2019

The Gentlemen of St John's performed to almost 600 children from Thorndown Primary School, St Ives and led a vocal workshop with their Year 4 pupils.

The ‘Gents’ are a vocal ensemble made up of Choral and Organ Scholars from the Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge. Kate Medlow – a teacher at Thorndown – wrote this account of The Gents’ visit:

'The children and staff at Thorndown Primary School were extremely lucky to have a visit from The Gentlemen of St John’s to perform during our Music Week from 1-5 July 2019.

The ‘Gents’ gave us an amazing vocal performance during assembly, performing songs ranging from ‘I’m a Believer’ to ‘Goodnight Sweetheart’. The children and staff loved every moment, toe-tapping and finger-clicking throughout the performance… some even got quite emotional.

'The singers captivated the School and even managed to teach almost 600 children to sing along with them.

Our Year 4 pupils then took part in a smaller workshop with The Gents. They worked on harmonies, word pronunciation and thoroughly enjoyed enhancing their own performance of ‘Goodnight Sweetheart’.

The Choir sang songs ranging from 'I'm a Believer' to 'Goodnight Sweetheart'.

'The feedback from the children was very positive.

“They blew my mind with their amazing singing!”

“I want to be a Gent when I am older. They really inspired me to sing.”

The staff and pupils from Thorndown Primary School would like to say a huge thank you to The Gentlemen of St John’s for visiting us.'

The ‘Gents’ are a vocal ensemble made up of Choral and Organ Scholars from the Choir of St John’s College, Cambridge.

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